The film version of William Young’s novel The Shack just hit theaters. Critics hate it. The audience seems to like it. If you’re thinking about seeing the movie, take a few minutes to read this piece by Al Mohler, president of Southern Seminary (and basically a walking Google). Here are some of his concluding words:

In evaluating the book, it must be kept in mind that The Shack is a work of fiction. But it is also a sustained theological argument, and this simply cannot be denied. Any number of notable novels and works of literature have contained aberrant theology, and even heresy. The crucial question is whether the aberrant doctrines are features of the story or the message of the work. When it comes to The Shack, the really troubling fact is that so many readers are drawn to the theological message of the book, and fail to see how it conflicts with the Bible at so many crucial points.

All this reveals a disastrous failure of evangelical discernment. It is hard not to conclude that theological discernment is now a lost art among American evangelicals — and this loss can only lead to theological catastrophe.

The answer is not to ban The Shack or yank it out of the hands of readers. We need not fear books — we must be ready to answer them. We desperately need a theological recovery that can only come from practicing biblical discernment. This will require us to identify the doctrinal dangers of The Shack, to be sure. But our real task is to reacquaint evangelicals with the Bible’s teachings on these very questions and to foster a doctrinal rearmament of Christian believers.

2 Comments

  1. Guess I would have to read more of this article to understand. To me it was a well written novel and as such did reflect many Biblical Truths. If someone is going to warn about certain Evangelical Christian Doctrinal falsehoods. Please take the time to be specific.

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